You Might Not Believe It, But These 27 Foods Are Vegan

You Might Not Believe It, But These 27 Foods Are Vegan

There are more people turning to the vegan lifestyle now than ever before. Being vegan means that you can’t eat any animal products, which cuts out common ingredients such as meat, dairy, and More »

The Ultimate Healthy and Clean Vegan Protein Cheat Sheet

The Ultimate Healthy and Clean Vegan Protein Cheat Sheet

Protein is a necessary dietary staple. In the body, amino acids, the building blocks of life, are made by ribosomes located in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells. These proteins then form tissues, organs, More »

Study Suggests Vegans Really Are Saving The World

Study Suggests Vegans Really Are Saving The World

Having a vegan friend may make it harder for you to choose a weekly brunch spot, but according to a new study, the small vegan population might just have the right idea. More »

How to Eat a Healthy Whole Foods, Plant-Based Diet on $50 Per Week

How to Eat a Healthy Whole Foods, Plant-Based Diet on $50 Per Week

Having a tight grocery budget is something most all of us can relate to at least at some point or another. We all have our ups and downs when it comes to More »

Broccoli Leaves And Stalk Are Healthier Than The Broccoli Flower

Broccoli Leaves And Stalk Are Healthier Than The Broccoli Flower

Kids do not like it, but you sure know that broccoli is the healthiest vegetable out there. The list of its benefits is never-ending, but do you make any difference between the More »

 

8 Million Fewer Would Die if the World Went Vegan

160321-fruit-vegetables-mn-1950_f3cd667d9635fbfe9ee72e539ea38828.nbcnews-fp-1200-800[1]

By eating less meat and more fruit and vegetables, the world could prevent several million deaths per year by 2050, cut planet-warming emissions substantially, and save billions of dollars annually in healthcare costs and climate damage, researchers said. A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences is the first to estimate both the health and climate change impacts of a global move towards a more plant-based diet, they said. “We do not expect everybody to become vegan,” said lead author Marco Springmann of the Oxford Martin Program on the Future of Food.

You Might Not Believe It, But These 27 Foods Are Vegan

you-might-not-believe-it-but-these-27-foods-are-v-2-9907-1495485924-8_dblbig[1]

There are more people turning to the vegan lifestyle now than ever before. Being vegan means that you can’t eat any animal products, which cuts out common ingredients such as meat, dairy, and eggs.

This can often be difficult, especially when you start to feel hangry after your oh-so-boring history lecture and need a quick go-to snack. If you’re looking for a delectable treat that fits the vegan lifestyle, munch down on one of these completely vegan snacks (although I can’t guarantee they will be the most nutritious choices).

1. Nutter Butters

Nabisco

The Ultimate Healthy and Clean Vegan Protein Cheat Sheet

hjh

Protein is a necessary dietary staple. In the body, amino acids, the building blocks of life, are made by ribosomes located in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells. These proteins then form tissues, organs, organ systems, and make up the entire human body.

THIS IS THE VEGAN BRAND LEONARDO DICAPRIO JUST INVESTED IN

leonardo-investment[1]

Award-winning actor Leonardo DiCaprio and investment firm Strand Equity Partners invested an undisclosed amount for a minority stake in vegan snack company HIPPEAS this week. “I’M TRULY EXCITED THAT STRAND EQUITY PARTNERS AND [DICAPRIO] HAVE JOINED THE HIPPEAS FAMILY,” HIPPEAS CEO LIVIO BISTERZO SAID.

Study Suggests Vegans Really Are Saving The World

World map with spices and herbs

Having a vegan friend may make it harder for you to choose a weekly brunch spot, but according to a new study, the small vegan population might just have the right idea. Turns out, going vegan could be the key to saving both the planet and millions of lives.

How to Eat a Healthy Whole Foods, Plant-Based Diet on $50 Per Week

grocery-1200x8001-800x445[1]

Having a tight grocery budget is something most all of us can relate to at least at some point or another. We all have our ups and downs when it comes to a food budget, and if you’re ever had to watch every penny, you know it can be tough. Sadly, a whole foods, plant-based diet is still seen as an incredibly hard task to manage. “Healthy eating is too expensive!”

How many times have we all heard (or said) that?

Well, the options are now easier than ever and more affordable when it comes to eating a healthy, whole food and completely plant-based diet if you want to give this a shot. If you have $50 per week to designate for groceries, you can easily eat healthy, cheap, and stay full and satisfied at the same time. The USDA reports that of March in 2015, the average food cost for females per week ranged between $47 (low-income) to $57 (moderate income). Mens’ budgets were roughly $20 higher in each group. Many of us buy way more than that each week, and yet find ourselves with food leftover and possibly throwing food out week after week. We’re all human and let cravings, moods, and multiple trips at the store influence our ability to stay on a food budget and eat what we have.

So, let’s take a look at how eating healthy, plant-based, and budget-friendly can be done.

Spend $20 on Fresh Produce

SUPERMARKET (1)

Always keep $20 of your food budget for fresh produce. This will do several things all at once: First, it keeps you accountable for choosing the best foods possible first, it ensures that you have a good amount of fresh food in your diet each week, and it prevents you from spending all your $50 on boatloads of fruit and vegetables you likely won’t be able to eat in a week. If you can choose organic, please do. It’s much healthier for you due to less pesticide exposure, and is very easy to do these days with more stores offering affordable organic foods.

Here’s a great idea to start with:

1. One bag of chopped organic kale  (or spinach)- $5

2. One head of broccoli (and/or cauliflower!)- $3

3. One bag of organic apples (or bananas, etc.) -$5

4. One bunch of organic celery -$3

5. Two Avocados or Sweet Potatoes, Onions, etc.- $4

If you want to designate $5 more dollars to your budget here, choose lettuces like romaine, or a spinach mix instead. Don’t want apples one week? Choose some oranges and bananas instead. And if you’re one of the few people that doesn’t like avocados, buy a different veggie or more fruit instead. If you need to carry a calculator with you, do it! Or, just use your phone and tally up as you go.

Spend $10-$15 in the Bulk Section

bulk-bin-whole-foods

Now it’s time to head to the bulk bins. Here you’ll want to buy some grains, beans, nuts, and seeds, except … don’t go crazy with amounts. You don’t need a pound of almonds to eat all week long and don’t need a pound of beans either. Or, skip the bulk beans if you don’t like soaking them, and spend a few dollars on some canned options instead. Purchase nuts and seeds in 1 ounce amounts and only choose a few different ones each week.  Remember, you can always try a new kind next week.

Here are some good examples of what you could buy:

1. $3 worth of whole grain oats

2. $3 worth of raw almonds

3. $2 of beans

4. $2 of whole grain quinoa or rice

But…Don’t Neglect Some of the Options on the Aisle

wholefoodscanned

If you prefer, you can also purchase oats and rice in larger bags found in the aisles (or in containers) that are roughly around the same price. Choose this option if you’re fine with eating the same grain all week and save a new grain for next week. Canned beans are also pretty affordable, which makes them a great option if you don’t have time on your hands and don’t want to go through several steps to cook them.

Check out These Ideas:

1. Two cans of chickpeas – $4

2. One bag of lentils- $3

3. One container of oats- $3

4. One bag of organic flax seed- $3

Spend $5-7 on Non-dairy Items

silkalmond

Pick up a couple of non-dairy milks; you’ll likely need only one, but if you have a child, roommate, sibling, or you just love the stuff, you might need an extra container. Or, buy a container of non-dairy yogurt if you enjoy it. No need to spend too much of your money here, but non-dairy milk is one of those “must-have items” for many of us, even if we eat whole foods otherwise.

Spend the Rest on Frozen Veggies and Fruits

silkmilk1

Don’t neglect frozen foods when you’re trying to eat healthy and on a budget; they’re actually very healthy for you! Plain frozen greens, berries, and veggies like broccoli are must-haves for budget-savvy individuals watching the pennies. A pound of organic frozen spinach costs around $3 per bag, which would easily last you several servings. A pound of frozen fruit is usually around the same amount and you won’t have to worry about it spoiling before you eat it all. You can use frozen veggies in meals when the fresh veggies run out, and you can use the greens in fruits in your morning smoothies!

Here are some ideas:

1. One bag of frozen spinach – $2-$3

2. One bag of frozen berries- $3-4

3. One bag of frozen broccoli or mixed veggies – $4

What About Protein?

The-Truth-About-Hemp-Seeds (2)

If you’re concerned about protein, you have some options. First, don’t neglect the beans, legumes, and oats which are all great sources, along with other foods high in protein too. Or, if you’d prefer, choose some tofu, tempeh, or even hemp seeds instead of bulk beans, legumes, and nuts. Eat plenty of produce, and some sort of bean, legume, grain, nut/seed daily. A bag of hemp seeds (a complete protein source) is around $8, some smaller bags are less, or if you can swing it, hemp protein is also around $12-$14 per pound, and will easily last you a month per container for smoothies.

Store-1200x800

 

Lead Image Source: Flickr

Source

Broccoli Leaves And Stalk Are Healthier Than The Broccoli Flower

broccoli-leaves-and-stalk-are-healthier-than-the-actual-broccoli-flower1[1]

Kids do not like it, but you sure know that broccoli is the healthiest vegetable out there. The list of its benefits is never-ending, but do you make any difference between the parts of it?
To be more precise, do you know which parts are edible, and how much do you actually know about its healing properties? What is more, do you know to prepare broccoli properly? Hopefully, this article will give you the answers to all of your questions.

We usually use the broccoli flower. It is rich in antioxidants, vitamins A, C and E, calcium and magnesium.

But, what about the stalks? Have you ever wondered if broccoli leaves are edible? Yes, both leaves and stalks are edible. This may come as a surprise to you, but 30 grams of broccoli leaves (the ones that usually end up in the trash can) contain about 90% of the recommended daily intake of vitamin A, important for the immune system and vision.
The same amount of broccoli leaves contains 43% of the recommended daily intake of vitamin C. We do not have to remind you that vitamin C has proven to be effective in the prevention against cancer, right? Remember, you should not throw those precious leaves in the trash can.

You are probably doing the same mistake with the stalks. Broccoli stalks taste sweet and they contain more fiber than the flower itself. Since broccoli stalks require longer cooking, cook them before you add the rest of the vegetable.
Broccoli is one of the healthiest vegetables. Moreover, you can enjoy every single bit of it and protect your health.

Source: www.healthyfoodstar.com

13 Meals With Tons Of Protein And No Meat

23[1]

These meals will get plenty of protein into your diet without any help from bacon.(Yes, it’s possible!)

1. Quinoa with Acorn Squash & Pomegranate

Quinoa with Acorn Squash & Pomegranate

This colourful and fresh dish is packed full of protein-rich quinoa (pronounced Keen-Wah, for the food noobs). View the full recipe here.

2. Curry Tofu Tacos With Pintos & Kale Slaw

Curry Tofu Tacos With Pintos & Kale Slaw

Love it or hate it, tofu is an excellent source of protein. Just make sure that you marinade it well and you can completely transform its taste. View the full recipe here.

3. Walnut and Vegetable Lasagne

Walnut and Vegetable Lasagne

This is one of my recipes (I LOVE walnuts). Walnuts have 15g of protein per 100g which isn’t too far off that of most meats. View the full recipe here.

4. Black Bean Salad

Black Bean Salad

Give yourself hefty portions to up the protein in this filling salad. Recipe available here.

5. Black Bean & Wheatberry Chili

Black Bean & Wheatberry Chili

Black beans (and most beans) are full to the brim with protein. Not only that but they’re rich in fibre and low in fat – bonus! View the full recipe here.

6. Cream of Red Lentil Soup

Cream of Red Lentil Soup

Lentils are another perfect source of protein for non-meat eaters. There’s loads of different types of lentils and they’re very versatile ingredients. This one’s great to warm you up through those cold winter nights. View the full recipe here.

7. Thai Massaman Curry with Sweet Potatoes and Tofu

Thai Massaman Curry with Sweet Potatoes and Tofu

Without doubt, this is my favourite dish of all time. During my travels across Thailand, I virtually lived off of these. With nuts and tofu making up the base of this dish, you’re going to get a ton of protein from it. Plus, it’s delicious. View the full recipe here.

8. Lemon Potato & Edamame Salad

Lemon Potato & Edamame Salad

If you’re not sure what edamame are, they’re essentially soybeans full of deliciousness. They’re higher in protein than tofu, lentils and quinoa (per serving) and also contain a ton of healthy fats, which is always helpful. View the full recipe here.

9. Warm Millet with Broccoli & Walnut

Warm Millet with Broccoli & Walnut

Millet is fairly similar to cous cous or quinoa, so if you like either of those, it’s likely that you’ll like millet as well. It’s packed with protein (1 serving = 6g of protein) and is cheap and easy to cook with. What more could you want? View the full recipe here.

10. Seitan Stuffed with Walnuts, Dried Cranberries and Mushrooms

Seitan Stuffed with Walnuts, Dried Cranberries and Mushrooms

Possibly the best source of protein outside of meat, seitan is a versatile ingredient made from wheat gluten. It’s simple to make and can be formed into tons of different recipes. View the full recipe here.

11. Mixed Bean Vegetarian Chilli

Mixed Bean Vegetarian Chilli

I love a good chilli. Whether it’s as a winter warmer or on a warm spring evening, this recipe works great. The beans within the dish are a great source of protein and they taste great. View the full recipe here

12. Breakfast Tofu Scramble

Breakfast Tofu Scramble

High protein veggie breakfasts are few and far between – this tofu scramble also has a load of kale in it (a really protein rich vegetable). View the full recipe here.

13. Corn and Quinoa Chowder

Corn and Quinoa Chowder

Corn is another one of those vegetables that you don’t realise how much protein is within it. It’s nearly 20% protein (9g per 100g) and combined with the quinoa in this dish, which is around 14g per 100g, it makes it the perfect veggie dish. View the full recipe here.

Source

Best cities for vegans around the world

most-vegan-friendly-cities-world[1]

By Travis Levius, for CNN
Way back in ancient Greece, Plato was philosophizing about a menu based solely on greenery, making him — along with Buddha, Gandhi and Einstein — among history’s foremost plant diet trendsetters. Even so, the vegan lifestyle is having a remarkable boom today, with a proliferation of in-demand meat and dairy-free restaurants, bakeries and bars around the globe. In light of PETA officially declaring 2016 “#TheYearofVegan,” here are our top picks for cities with the best lean, green vegan scenes.

5 THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW WILL HAPPEN WHEN YOU STOP EATING MEAT

human-body-759x436[1]

Nearly a third of Britons have reduced their meat consumption over the last year, according to the British Social Attitudes survey. Pollsters found 29 per cent of people had reduced their consumption of meat in the last year, nine per cent said they were considering reducing their meat intake or cutting it out entirely, and about three per cent were already vegetarian or vegan. Vowing to ditch steaks and burgers in favour of a vegetarian lifestyle may have crossed your mind for ethical reasons or because of concerns about red meat and health. So, what actually happens to your body when you stop eating meat?

Support us!

If you like this site please help and make click on the button below!