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There’s A Big Difference Between A Plant-Based Diet And A Vegan Diet

Woman With Fresh Harvest

By huffpost
Reducetarianflexitarianvegetarian ― there’s a diet out there for everyone. That’s why it’s more important than ever to make sure we get it all straight. One diet (or lifestyle) that’s been gaining in popularity among nutritionists, celebritiesand millennials is the whole foods plant-based diet. The diet mostly appeals to anyone who’s looking to live a healthier lifestyle, but its smaller environmental footprint makes it particularly appealing to millennials. If you’ve heard people talking about a whole foods plant-based diet, you may have thought this was basically just another word for veganism, but you’d be wrong. Really wrong. And we’re going to explain why.

Vegans abstain from eating any animal products. According to The Vegan Society, “Veganism is a way of living which seeks to exclude, as far as is possible and practicable, all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose.” This means that many vegans also don’t purchase leather goods. But it doesn’t necessarily mean they’re eating lots of whole foods plant-based meals. Vegans could get through life eating processed foods and snubbing their veggies just like anyone else. Think potato chips, (vegan-friendly) gummy candy, and even cookies.

whole foods plant-based diet, on the other hand, emphasizes eating whole fruits and vegetables, consuming lots of whole grains, and staying away from (or at least minimizing) the intake of animal products and processed foods for health reasons. That means that even vegan desserts made with refined sugar or bleached flour are out. It does not restrict their purchase of leather goods.

There are no strict guidelines or definitions for what constitute a whole foods plant-based diet other than focusing on eating lots of fresh produce and minimally processed foods. Some people on a whole foods plant-based diet don’t eat any animal products, while others will eat a restricted amount. It’s flexible in that way, but strict in its focus on eating whole foods.

We’re not saying that a vegan can’t be on a whole foods plant-based diet or vice versa, but the two are not interchangeable and we want to make sure you know it.

This guy drank ten cans of Coke a day. Here’s what he looked like after a month…

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A lot has been and still is said about the dangers of excessive sugar consumption, and there is much criticism of brands like Coca-Cola and Pepsi for playing a role in this unhealthy development.

8 Foods You’ll Be Surprised To Learn Aren’t Always Vegan

Glasses of light and dark beer on a pub background.

By Julie R. Thomson
We live in a very vegan-friendly food world these days. Even Ben & Jerry’s has put out a couple of vegan flavors. Unfortunately, not all foods are so nice.  We hate to be the bearers of bad news, but there’s a chance that some of your favorite foods are not as vegan-friendly as you may have thought. You probably already know that honey isn’t vegan and you know the ugly truth about red food dye (it’s made out of crushed beetles), but there are more foods you’d never suspect are made with the help of animal products. We’re talking candy, beer and sometimes even cereal.

GOING VEGAN IS HARD: 8 INCONVENIENT TRUTHS WE ALL NEED TO ADMIT

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OK, before I get bombarded with comments on how I am trying to scare people off veganism, let me get this straight: I do think going vegan can be very easy, once you set your belief system and mind into it. Yet, there are some ‘hard’ aspects of it that people should be prepared for. How would you feel if someone told you swimming was easy, without letting you know what exactly you should expect when you go into the water? Most likely, you will start choking! And quickly give up… It’s a good idea to admit some of the difficulties of going vegan and take the pink glasses off for a little while.

You Might Not Believe It, But These 27 Foods Are Vegan

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There are more people turning to the vegan lifestyle now than ever before. Being vegan means that you can’t eat any animal products, which cuts out common ingredients such as meat, dairy, and eggs.

This can often be difficult, especially when you start to feel hangry after your oh-so-boring history lecture and need a quick go-to snack. If you’re looking for a delectable treat that fits the vegan lifestyle, munch down on one of these completely vegan snacks (although I can’t guarantee they will be the most nutritious choices).

1. Nutter Butters

Nabisco

The Ultimate Healthy and Clean Vegan Protein Cheat Sheet

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Protein is a necessary dietary staple. In the body, amino acids, the building blocks of life, are made by ribosomes located in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells. These proteins then form tissues, organs, organ systems, and make up the entire human body.

Study Suggests Vegans Really Are Saving The World

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Having a vegan friend may make it harder for you to choose a weekly brunch spot, but according to a new study, the small vegan population might just have the right idea. Turns out, going vegan could be the key to saving both the planet and millions of lives.

How to Eat a Healthy Whole Foods, Plant-Based Diet on $50 Per Week

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Having a tight grocery budget is something most all of us can relate to at least at some point or another. We all have our ups and downs when it comes to a food budget, and if you’re ever had to watch every penny, you know it can be tough. Sadly, a whole foods, plant-based diet is still seen as an incredibly hard task to manage. “Healthy eating is too expensive!”

How many times have we all heard (or said) that?

Well, the options are now easier than ever and more affordable when it comes to eating a healthy, whole food and completely plant-based diet if you want to give this a shot. If you have $50 per week to designate for groceries, you can easily eat healthy, cheap, and stay full and satisfied at the same time. The USDA reports that of March in 2015, the average food cost for females per week ranged between $47 (low-income) to $57 (moderate income). Mens’ budgets were roughly $20 higher in each group. Many of us buy way more than that each week, and yet find ourselves with food leftover and possibly throwing food out week after week. We’re all human and let cravings, moods, and multiple trips at the store influence our ability to stay on a food budget and eat what we have.

So, let’s take a look at how eating healthy, plant-based, and budget-friendly can be done.

Spend $20 on Fresh Produce

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Always keep $20 of your food budget for fresh produce. This will do several things all at once: First, it keeps you accountable for choosing the best foods possible first, it ensures that you have a good amount of fresh food in your diet each week, and it prevents you from spending all your $50 on boatloads of fruit and vegetables you likely won’t be able to eat in a week. If you can choose organic, please do. It’s much healthier for you due to less pesticide exposure, and is very easy to do these days with more stores offering affordable organic foods.

Here’s a great idea to start with:

1. One bag of chopped organic kale  (or spinach)- $5

2. One head of broccoli (and/or cauliflower!)- $3

3. One bag of organic apples (or bananas, etc.) -$5

4. One bunch of organic celery -$3

5. Two Avocados or Sweet Potatoes, Onions, etc.- $4

If you want to designate $5 more dollars to your budget here, choose lettuces like romaine, or a spinach mix instead. Don’t want apples one week? Choose some oranges and bananas instead. And if you’re one of the few people that doesn’t like avocados, buy a different veggie or more fruit instead. If you need to carry a calculator with you, do it! Or, just use your phone and tally up as you go.

Spend $10-$15 in the Bulk Section

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Now it’s time to head to the bulk bins. Here you’ll want to buy some grains, beans, nuts, and seeds, except … don’t go crazy with amounts. You don’t need a pound of almonds to eat all week long and don’t need a pound of beans either. Or, skip the bulk beans if you don’t like soaking them, and spend a few dollars on some canned options instead. Purchase nuts and seeds in 1 ounce amounts and only choose a few different ones each week.  Remember, you can always try a new kind next week.

Here are some good examples of what you could buy:

1. $3 worth of whole grain oats

2. $3 worth of raw almonds

3. $2 of beans

4. $2 of whole grain quinoa or rice

But…Don’t Neglect Some of the Options on the Aisle

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If you prefer, you can also purchase oats and rice in larger bags found in the aisles (or in containers) that are roughly around the same price. Choose this option if you’re fine with eating the same grain all week and save a new grain for next week. Canned beans are also pretty affordable, which makes them a great option if you don’t have time on your hands and don’t want to go through several steps to cook them.

Check out These Ideas:

1. Two cans of chickpeas – $4

2. One bag of lentils- $3

3. One container of oats- $3

4. One bag of organic flax seed- $3

Spend $5-7 on Non-dairy Items

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Pick up a couple of non-dairy milks; you’ll likely need only one, but if you have a child, roommate, sibling, or you just love the stuff, you might need an extra container. Or, buy a container of non-dairy yogurt if you enjoy it. No need to spend too much of your money here, but non-dairy milk is one of those “must-have items” for many of us, even if we eat whole foods otherwise.

Spend the Rest on Frozen Veggies and Fruits

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Don’t neglect frozen foods when you’re trying to eat healthy and on a budget; they’re actually very healthy for you! Plain frozen greens, berries, and veggies like broccoli are must-haves for budget-savvy individuals watching the pennies. A pound of organic frozen spinach costs around $3 per bag, which would easily last you several servings. A pound of frozen fruit is usually around the same amount and you won’t have to worry about it spoiling before you eat it all. You can use frozen veggies in meals when the fresh veggies run out, and you can use the greens in fruits in your morning smoothies!

Here are some ideas:

1. One bag of frozen spinach – $2-$3

2. One bag of frozen berries- $3-4

3. One bag of frozen broccoli or mixed veggies – $4

What About Protein?

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If you’re concerned about protein, you have some options. First, don’t neglect the beans, legumes, and oats which are all great sources, along with other foods high in protein too. Or, if you’d prefer, choose some tofu, tempeh, or even hemp seeds instead of bulk beans, legumes, and nuts. Eat plenty of produce, and some sort of bean, legume, grain, nut/seed daily. A bag of hemp seeds (a complete protein source) is around $8, some smaller bags are less, or if you can swing it, hemp protein is also around $12-$14 per pound, and will easily last you a month per container for smoothies.

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Broccoli Leaves And Stalk Are Healthier Than The Broccoli Flower

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Kids do not like it, but you sure know that broccoli is the healthiest vegetable out there. The list of its benefits is never-ending, but do you make any difference between the parts of it?
To be more precise, do you know which parts are edible, and how much do you actually know about its healing properties? What is more, do you know to prepare broccoli properly? Hopefully, this article will give you the answers to all of your questions.

We usually use the broccoli flower. It is rich in antioxidants, vitamins A, C and E, calcium and magnesium.

But, what about the stalks? Have you ever wondered if broccoli leaves are edible? Yes, both leaves and stalks are edible. This may come as a surprise to you, but 30 grams of broccoli leaves (the ones that usually end up in the trash can) contain about 90% of the recommended daily intake of vitamin A, important for the immune system and vision.
The same amount of broccoli leaves contains 43% of the recommended daily intake of vitamin C. We do not have to remind you that vitamin C has proven to be effective in the prevention against cancer, right? Remember, you should not throw those precious leaves in the trash can.

You are probably doing the same mistake with the stalks. Broccoli stalks taste sweet and they contain more fiber than the flower itself. Since broccoli stalks require longer cooking, cook them before you add the rest of the vegetable.
Broccoli is one of the healthiest vegetables. Moreover, you can enjoy every single bit of it and protect your health.

Source: www.healthyfoodstar.com

Best cities for vegans around the world

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By Travis Levius, for CNN
Way back in ancient Greece, Plato was philosophizing about a menu based solely on greenery, making him — along with Buddha, Gandhi and Einstein — among history’s foremost plant diet trendsetters. Even so, the vegan lifestyle is having a remarkable boom today, with a proliferation of in-demand meat and dairy-free restaurants, bakeries and bars around the globe. In light of PETA officially declaring 2016 “#TheYearofVegan,” here are our top picks for cities with the best lean, green vegan scenes.

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