Category Archives: other

WOW! Canada Has Eliminated The Milk Category From National Food Guide And May Tell Residents To Choose Vegan!

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Well done, Canada!

After consulting with the public on plans to revise the national food guide, the Canadian government has now released a new draft of their healthy eating recommendations and the guide favors a “high proportion of plant-based foods”!

The food guide’s first recommendation notes the importance of whole foods and states that plant-based foods are the preferred source of protein. The guide recommends, “regular intake of vegetables, fruit, whole grains and protein-rich foods, especially plant-based sources of protein.” Wow!

THAT’S EXCITING ENOUGH, BUT THE DRAFT FOOD GUIDE HAS ELIMINATED THE MILK CATEGORY ENTIRELY AND LEGUMES HAVE BEEN PLACED HIGHER ABOVE ANIMAL FOODS. HOW AMAZING IS THAT!?

The food guide also notes that ““diets higher in plant-based foods and lower in animal-based foods are associated with a lesser environmental impact,” and acknowledges that the animal agriculture industry is linked to the environment. This is great news considering this destructive industry currently occupies over half of the world’s arable land resources, uses the majority of our freshwater stores, and drives more greenhouse gas emissions than the entire transportation sector combined. Plus, industrialized animal agriculture also  causes rampant air and water pollution, land degradation, deforestation and is pushing countless species to the brink of extinction.

THE FOOD GUIDE WAS BASED ON HEALTH EVIDENCE, AS WELL AS INFORMATION ON CANADIAN’S EATING HABITS, WITH INDUSTRY-COMMISSIONERS EXCLUDED FROM THE GUIDE.

The guide hasn’t been finalized yet and it’s imperative to show our support for this progressive change. You can click here to let the Canadian government know what you like about the food guide and please encourage your friends to do the same!

Knowing all that we do about the impact of meat consumption on the environment and animals, we are faced with a choice – either we can continue to be sold into this destructive industry … or we can choose better.

Source

 

12 Defining Moments In Every Vegan’s Life

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You know you’re an experienced vegan when you’ve lived all of these defining moments.

1. Finding out white sugar isn’t vegan.

That's right. Most conventional white sugar is filtered with bone char.

Via realitytvgifs.tumblr.com
That’s right. Most conventional white sugar is filtered with bone char.
 
2. Upgrading from Boca burgers to “whole food patties.”

Meat analogues are for amateurs. Quinoa and millet burgers for the win!

Via reactiongifs.com
Meat analogues are for amateurs. Quinoa and millet burgers for the win!

3. Purchasing a cookbook by Isa Chandra Moskowitz.
Bonus point if you start using the word "nooch" in place of nutritional yeast.
Via healthyeatingnews.net
Bonus point if you start using the word “nooch” in place of nutritional yeast.

4. Considering a move to Portland, OR solely based on the plethora of vegan options.

You can get almond milk lattes at the airport!

Via wannadobadthings.tumblr.com
You can get almond milk lattes at the airport!

5. Making avocado chocolate mousse.

The best part? Serving it to friends and family and asking them to guess the "secret ingredient."

Via reactiongifs.tumblr.com

The best part? Serving it to friends and family and asking them to guess the “secret ingredient.”

6. Purchasing a “nut milk” bag to make your own almond milk.

Hardcore vegan brownie points for making a nut milk that is not commercially available (i.e.: pecan milk, walnut milk).

Via reactiongifs.com
Hardcore vegan brownie points for making a nut milk that is not commercially available (i.e.: pecan milk, walnut milk).

7. Staying zen when asked questions about veganism that used to irritate you.

"Do you eat enough protein?"/ "Doesn't soy give you man-boobs?"/ "How are you not starving all the time?"/ "Would you eat an animal if it died of natural causes?"/ Etc...

Via reactiongifs.com

“Do you eat enough protein?”/ “Doesn’t soy give you man-boobs?”/ “How are you not starving all the time?”/ “Would you eat an animal if it died of natural causes?”/ Etc…
 
8. Mastering the art of getting nutritional yeast to stick to popcorn

Tip: Spray the popped kernels with olive or coconut oil, and *then* sprinkle the "nooch."

 Via reactiongifs.com

Tip: Spray the popped kernels with olive or coconut oil, and *then* sprinkle the “nooch.”

9. Feeling conflicted and hypocritical about the fact that your pet is not vegan.

When you Googled "can my cat be vegan?", you just ended up more confused.

Via cutecatgifs.com
When you Googled “can my cat be vegan?”, you just ended up more confused.

10. Becoming a hummus connoiseur and realizing most store brands don’t come close to your homemade recipe.

And you know hummus is the best salad dressing!

Via realitytvgifs.tumblr.com

And you know hummus is the best salad dressing!

11. Knowing the protein content of every single vegetable.

You know you've achieved "expert vegan" status when you've memorized the protein content of broccoli.

Via whatshouldbetchescallme.tumblr.com

You know you’ve achieved “expert vegan” status when you’ve memorized the protein content of broccoli.

12. Crafting a fantastic restaurant meal out of side dishes in less than 5 seconds.
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Via reactiongifs.com

“I’ll have a side of plantains, a side of black beans, a side of guacamole, and a side of the sauteed spinach with garlic, please.”

Source

 

Vegan 16-Year-Old Keeps Surprising His Instagram Fans With His Stunning Desserts And Breakfasts

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You might already know about Jose, a 16-year-old vegan teen, who has almost 750k followers on Instagram because of his colorful and fun vegan food.


Jose’s motto is “Life is too short to eat boring food” so it makes sense that boy creates many different colorful food designs. His main shareable meals are smoothies, pies, and popsicles, mostly from frozen fruit and coconut milk.

Would you like to try any of these? Let us know down below.

More info: Instagram

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26 Vegan Classics You Should Learn How To Cook

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1. Vegetarian tofu scramble

It's filling, easy to whip up with whatever's in your fridge, and goes perfectly with starchy vegetables or wrapped up in a tortilla. Recipe here.

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It’s filling, easy to whip up with whatever’s in your fridge, and goes perfectly with starchy vegetables or wrapped up in a tortilla. Recipe here.

2. Vegan nacho cheese

An ample serving of nutritional yeast and a tablespoon of white miso give this vegan cheese the flavorful kick you won't find in many grocery store vegan cheeses. And of course, if you want something less intense, you can simply use less nutritional yeast. Recipe here.

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An ample serving of nutritional yeast and a tablespoon of white miso give this vegan cheese the flavorful kick you won’t find in many grocery store vegan cheeses. And of course, if you want something less intense, you can simply use less nutritional yeast. Recipe here.

3. Crispy falafels

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Have you heard the good news about pan-fried falafel patties yet? They’re crunchy, savory, and can be paired with just about any type of green to make a complete meal. Recipe here.

4. Vegan Chili

The ideal recipe for making in large portions and reheating later. Recipe here.

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The ideal recipe for making in large portions and reheating later. Recipe here.

5. Mac & Cheese

Replicates that tangy cheesy flavor of all the best boxed mac 'n' cheese. (God bless nutritional yeast). Recipe here.

veggiebalance.com

Replicates that tangy cheesy flavor of all the best boxed mac ‘n’ cheese. (God bless nutritional yeast). Recipe here.

6. Sheet Pan Roasted Vegetables

The answer is yes, there is a better way to roast vegetables, and it involves all of the herbs. Namely, oregano, crushed rosemary, thyme, and basil. Recipe here.

theglowingfridge.com

The answer is yes, there is a better way to roast vegetables, and it involves all of the herbs. Namely, oregano, crushed rosemary, thyme, and basil. Recipe here.

7. Cauliflower Alfredo Sauce

Texture is a huge part of the eating experience, and thankfully this sauce replicates the smooth and creamy feel of the non-vegan stuff pretty accurately. Recipe here.

theendlessmeal.com

Texture is a huge part of the eating experience, and thankfully this sauce replicates the smooth and creamy feel of the non-vegan stuff pretty accurately. Recipe here.

8. Buddha Bowl

There's really no wrong way to put together a buddha bowl. Just throw in some protein, vegetables, and grains, and you're good to go. Here's one recipe to get you started.

wellandfull.com

There’s really no wrong way to put together a buddha bowl. Just throw in some protein, vegetables, and grains, and you’re good to go. Here’s one recipe to get you started.

9. Miso, Spinach, And Mushroom Ramen

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Never underestimate the power of mushrooms and a miso slurry to transform a simple vegetable broth into a tasty, lick-your-bowl-clean ramen base. Recipe here.

10. Tempeh Reuben

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Vegans know that there are a ton of non-animal source of protein, with tempeh being one of the most flexible ones. Sweeten it up to make orange tempeh, or use liquid smoke to make the spicy, savory variation above. Recipe here.

11. Baked Tofu Nuggets

Crispy tofu cubes are great as a snack, or added to stir-frys, salads, and other bowls. Recipe here.

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Crispy tofu cubes are great as a snack, or added to stir-frys, salads, and other bowls. Recipe here.

12. Tortilla Soup With Avocado

A quick soup recipe that'll actually fill you up. Recipe here.

vegetariangastronomy.com

A quick soup recipe that’ll actually fill you up. Recipe here.

13. Lemony Quinoa Brussels Sprouts Salad

Awesome on its own (maybe with a drizzle of tahini!) or as a base for all your meals. Recipe here.

theglowingfridge.com

Awesome on its own (maybe with a drizzle of tahini!) or as a base for all your meals. Recipe here.

14. Cauliflower BBQ Pizza

Cheese is anything but essential to making a great-tasting pizza. This one's savory, sweet, and just a little crispy from the roasted cauliflowers. Recipe here.

thissavoryvegan.com

Cheese is anything but essential to making a great-tasting pizza. This one’s savory, sweet, and just a little crispy from the roasted cauliflowers. Recipe here.

15. Eggplant, Caramelized Onion, And Tomato Pasta

Heat + eggplants and onions = Delicious, sweet, caramelized vegetables that perfectly complement tangy tomato sauce. Recipe here.

wellvegan.com

Heat + eggplants and onions = Delicious, sweet, caramelized vegetables that perfectly complement tangy tomato sauce. Recipe here.

16. Zuppa Toscana

Ideal for a cozy weeknight in (or when you just have a sack full of potatoes you need to get rid of 😅). Use full-fat coconut milk for the creamiest results. Recipe here.

yummymummykitchen.com

Ideal for a cozy weeknight in (or when you just have a sack full of potatoes you need to get rid of 😅). Use full-fat coconut milk for the creamiest results. Recipe here.

17. Fried Rice

minimalistbaker.com

Take-out is great, but this healthyish dish with spicy peanut sauce is even better. Recipe here.

18. Sloppy Joes

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Add more cumin for extra smokiness. Recipe here.

19. Vegan Meatballs

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Twirling pasta around a fork and biting into a giant “meatball” has got to be one of the funnest eating experiences, and no vegan should go without it. Recipe here.

20. Italian Eggplant Sandwich

Because not every meat replacement has to involve beans. Recipe here.

theedgyveg.com

Because not every meat replacement has to involve beans. Recipe here.

21. Balsamic Roasted Potatoes With Asparagus

Add in sweet potatoes, parsnips, or other root vegetables to liven up this one-pan side dish. Recipe here.

wallflowerkitchen.com

Add in sweet potatoes, parsnips, or other root vegetables to liven up this one-pan side dish. Recipe here.

22. Vegan Beef Stroganoff

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You can also opt for Gardein Beefless Tips or tempeh instead of seitan. Read up on all the vegan meat substitutes out there here. Recipe here.

23. Creamy Hummus

Hands down the creamiest and most addictive hummus recipe you'll ever try (The magic is in the tahini). Recipe here.

Etorres69 / Getty Images

Hands down the creamiest and most addictive hummus recipe you’ll ever try (The magic is in the tahini). Recipe here.

24. Lasagna With Hummus Tofu Ricotta

You could technically buy a vegan ricotta substitute, or you can make this lasagna with vegan tofu-hummus ricotta that is somehow able to perfectly replicate the dairy stuff. Pro tip: Make extra tofu ricotta to snack on later. Recipe here.

hummusapien.com

You could technically buy a vegan ricotta substitute, or you can make this lasagna with vegan tofu-hummus ricotta that is somehow able to perfectly replicate the dairy stuff. Pro tip: Make extra tofu ricotta to snack on later. Recipe here.

25. Parmesan Cheese

Takes just four ingredients and less than five minutes of your time. Recipe here.

thethrivingvegan.com

Takes just four ingredients and less than five minutes of your time. Recipe here.

26. Potato And Onion Omelette

Thanks to chickpea flour, you can get a hearty serving of protein with every bite. (And have an answer for every time your friends ask you how you're getting your protein 🙃.) Recipe here.

wallflowerkitchen.com

Thanks to chickpea flour, you can get a hearty serving of protein with every bite. (And have an answer for every time your friends ask you how you’re getting your protein 🙃.) Recipe here.

Source

These 10 elite athletes are vegan — here’s what made them switch their diet

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Improving everything from cholesterol and heart rate to concentration and a solid night’s sleep, there seem to be plenty of health benefits to ditching dairy, meat, and eggs.

However, one thing that many people worry about when going vegan is getting enough protein.

Surprisingly, many top athletes — including world champions, martial artists, and an Olympic weightlifter — don’t seem to be worried in the slightest about getting enough protein from their vegan diets.

Business Insider has compiled a list of world-class vegan athletes who are at the top of their game — and have a fully vegan lifestyle to thank for it.

From football strikers to weightlifters, scroll on to discover 10 athletes who are vegan — and what made each of them switch to a plant-based diet.

Venus Williams — tennis player

Venus Williams — tennis player

Reuters/Toby Melville

Venus Williams is an American tennis player who has won seven Grand Slam singles titles and 14 Grand Slam Women’s doubles titles. She has also won the prestigious Wimbledon women’s singles title five times and has four Olympic gold medals.

Williams has an estimated net worth of £72 million ($95 million), and is the second highest-earning female tennis player of all time behind her sister Serena.

The tennis star adopted a raw vegan diet after she was diagnosed with Sjögren’s syndrome in 2011 and doctors advised it would relieve some of her symptoms such as extreme fatigue and joint pain.

In an interview with Health magazine about the disease and her raw vegan diet, Williams said: “I was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease, and I wanted to maintain my performance on the court. Once I started, I fell in love with the concept of fueling your body in the best way possible [through raw, vegan food].

“Not only does it help me on the court, but I feel like I’m doing the right thing for me.”

Lewis Hamilton — Formula 1 racing driver

Lewis Hamilton — Formula 1 racing driver

Reuters/Edgar SU

Four-time Formula 1 world champion Lewis Hamilton won his fourth title this week after adopting a vegan diet earlier in 2017.

Hamilton is the world’s 10th highest-paid athlete, according to Forbes. Thanks to his endorsements and brand deals with L’Oreal, Mercedes, and Puma — amongst others — the Formula One driver has an approximate net worth of £131 million ($172 million).

Talking to the BBC about his recent transition to a vegan diet, Hamilton said: “As the human race, what we are doing to the world… the pollution [in terms of emissions of global-warming gases] coming from the amount of cows that are being produced is incredible. They say it is more than what we produce with our flights and our cars, which is kind of crazy to think. The cruelty is horrible and I don’t necessarily want to support that.”

Jermain Defoe — footballer

Jermain Defoe — footballer

Reuters/Peter Nicholls

Defoe is the seventh best goalscorer in Premier League history, scoring over 150 goals in the league to date. He plays for Bournemouth FC and the England national team — both as a striker.

Defoe earns £65k a week on his current contract with Bournemouth. His net worth is estimated at $20 million (£15.2 million), according to The Richest. Defoe credited his “comeback” in March earlier this year to his vegan diet, according to Men’s Health.

On giving up meat, eggs, and dairy, the striker told the Guardian: “I don’t find anything hard to give up… because I know the feeling scoring goals gives me.”

David Haye — boxer

David Haye — boxer

Reuters/Staff

David Haye is a British boxer with world titles in two weight categories. In 2008, he won three of the four major boxing world titles at cruiserweight. He has an estimated net worth of $26 million (£19.8 million) based on Fight Saga’s recent evaluation and more recent fights.

Haye researched the benefits of a plant-based diet on healing rates and recovery time after a serious shoulder injury prompted surgery and meant he had to take a break from the ring. He has now been vegan for four years.

Talking to The Sun earlier this year about physical strength on a plant-based diet, Haye said: “[Apes are] 20 times stronger than humans and they don’t rely on a meat-based diet. They eat plants all day long. It’s a myth that you need meat for strength.

“I have a full-time chef and a good nutritionist who makes sure I get all the minerals and nutrients required.”

Hannah Teter — snowboarder

Hannah Teter — snowboarder

Reuters/Lucas Jackson

Hannah Teter is an American snowboarder and three-time Olympic medalist.

She grew up in Vermont with her parents and older brothers (two of which are also Olympic snowboarders) in a fully sustainable house in the woods. Teter was taught to appreciate and love the environment from a young age, which brought her to vegetarian and vegan living after her gold medal achievement in 2010.

In an interview with Huffington Post, Teter said: “I feel stronger than I’ve ever been, mentally, physically, and emotionally. My plant-based diet has opened up more doors to being an athlete. It’s a whole other level that I’m elevating to. I stopped eating animals about a year ago, and it’s a new life. I feel like a new person, a new athlete.”

Kendrick Yahcob Farris — weightlifter

Kendrick Yahcob Farris — weightlifter

Getty/USA Today Sports

Kendrick Farris is an American Olympic weightlifter and finished 11th in his weight class at the 2016 Olympic games in Rio de Janeiro.

Farris made the decision to adopt a vegan diet based on religious reasons after the birth of his second son.

In an interview with Men’s Fitness, Farris said: “You can replace [meat with pulses and vegetables], and it can taste amazing, and be better for your body — it’ll help with recovery, reduce stress and inflammation in the body.

“We shouldn’t get so caught up with ‘protein, protein, protein.’ Because you can get an excess of protein, and most of it just gets passed through the body.”

Nate Diaz — mixed martial artist

Nate Diaz — mixed martial artist

Reuters/USA Today Sports

Nate Diaz is a mixed martial artist currently competing in UFC — the world’s biggest mixed martial arts organisation.

Diaz first became vegan aged 18, inspired by his older brother and former welterweight champion in Strikeforce and WEC, Nick Diaz.

“I think you’re a smarter and more intelligent fighter [when you go vegan]. Me and my brother are at the top of the game and have been for a long time. We’re obviously doing something right. Besides knowing how to kick somebody in the head, you should know how to feel good tomorrow,” Diaz told Men’s Journal.

Meagan Duhamel — pairs skater

Meagan Duhamel — pairs skater

Reuters/Jean-Paul Pelissier

Meagan Duhamel is a four-time world champion and Olympic medalist pair skater. She is also a two-time Four Continents champion and a six-time Canadian national champion pair skater. Her career highlights so far include winning a silver medal at the 2014 Olympic games in the team event and winning every major championship (both national and international) in the 2014-2015 season.

Duhamel adopted a vegan diet in 2008 after reading a book about veganism she spotted in an airport lounge. She read it cover-to-cover that night and emptied her fridge of all animal products the very next morning.

In an interview with CBC in 2016, Duhamel said: “I just thought, ‘Wow, that seems so interesting.’ I woke up the next morning, cleaned out my fridge, and said ‘I’m going to learn about whole grains, and fruits and vegetables.'”

Jack Lindquist — track cyclist

Jack Lindquist is an American sprint cyclist and keen blogger. The cyclist adopted a vegan diet in 2005 after some close vegan friends explained the benefits of the regime to him.

“[My friends] asked me what the difference was between the love I had for my dog, The Reverend, and any animal that was on a farm ready to be slaughtered. I didn’t have an answer, so that was that,” Lindquist said in an interview with fellow blogger, Trevor Lucius.

“If nothing I am very driven by logic and reason, and not having a good reason to keep killing animals, whom I claimed to love, I stopped,” he said.

Abel “Killa” Trujillo — mixed martial artist

Abel “Killa” Trujillo is a mixed martial artist currently competing in UFC.

The American credits his titles to his vegan lifestyle — as well as compassion towards animals and the earth.

Trujillo frequently writes about veganism and compassionate living on his Twitter account. In July, the athlete wrote: “Happiness is the new rich. Inner peace is the new success. Health is the new wealth. Compassion is the new cool.”

By businessinsider

Move Over McDonald’s, The Future Of Fast Food Is Vegan

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The shift towards a healthier and more mindful way of eating is well underway. In the past 10 years the amount of animals killed for human consumption was decreased by half a billion as the world has begun to wake up to the benefits of a meat-free lifestyle. Once a trendy fad, veganism is now one of the most up and coming diets, but it is more than that, it’s a lifestyle.

The 11 Vegan Food Hacks You Didn’t Know You Needed (but You Totally Do)

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1. Banana + Peanut Butter + Cocoa Powder = Ice Cream

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We don’t need no stinkin’ ice cream maker.

2. Cake Mix + Can of Soda = Cake

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But about as healthy as it sounds.

3. Plate + Tofu + Paper Towel + Plate + Heavy Stuff = Tofu Press

Getting the extra water out will change your life.

4. Avocado = Mayo

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BUT BETTER.

5. Banana = 2 Eggs

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Perfect for pancakes.

6. Carrot = Hot Dog

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Marinate it, and you can’t tell the difference.

7. Any Soup/Chili/Sauce + Nutritional Yeast = Cheesy Goodness

Vegan Spaghettios

I can’t explain it. It just happens.

8. This Stuff = Vegan

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SNACKS!

9. Vegan Cream Cheese + Vegan Chili = Chili Cheese Dip

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Heat, mix, gorge.

10. Cake Mix + Can of Pumpkin = Pumpkin Cake/Cupcakes

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Like rilly rilly good.

11. Sriracha + Vegenaise = Heaven

Ultimate Sriracha Veggie Burger
© Leo Gong 
By Peta

21 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

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If you’re vegan that you’ve probably received that look at least once. You know, the one of pure bafflement as someone looks at you and asks, ‘But where do you get your protein from?’ It’s a frustrating process trying to explain the many ways in which a vegan can get protein into their diet without the consumption of meat, but by then people have already made up their minds that you’ll be deficient in protein and become severely ill by living as a vegan.

How wrong people can be! Being vegan means that you’re probably putting so much more goodness into your body. For years now, we’ve had the ‘meat is the only protein’ myth shoved down our throats but very slowly, people are starting to learn that while protein is certainly an essential nutrient which plays many key roles in the way our bodies function, we don’t actually need huge quantities of it. Only about one calorie out of every 10 we take in needs to come from protein. Vegan athletes, especially in the early stages of training, may have higher protein needs than vegans who exercise moderately or who are not active, but even in those cases, protein supplements aren’t needed to get a decent protein intake.

Here 21 great high protein vegan recipes for all three meals of the day, allowing any vegan to stay as fit as a fiddle whilst following a healthy, cruelty-free diet.

1. The Ultimate Vegan Protein Burrito by Blissful Basil

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

2. Chickpea Nuggets by The Kitchn

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

3. Vegan Breakfast Sandwich by Vegan Huggs

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

4. Almond Energy Bars by Eaten By Sam

Simple and healthy vegan almond energy bars

5. Vegan Chow Mein with Gluten Free Zucchini Noodles & Marinated Tofu by Abbey’s Kitchen

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

6. Chocolate Protein French Toast by Stephanie Goldmarie

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

7. Scrambled Tofu Breakfast Burrito (30 minutes) by Minimalist Baker

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

8. BBQ Chickpea Salad by It Doesn’t Taste like Chicken

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

9. Warm and Nutty Cinnamon Quinoa by 101 Cook Books

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

10. Cauliflower Rice Burrito Bowl by Minimalist Baker

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

11. Chickpea and Mushroom Burger (Trinity’s Kitchen)

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

12. Chickpea, Tofu and Eggplant Curry by The Endless Meal

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

13. Roasted Teriyaki Mushrooms and Broccolini Soba Noodles by Sobremesa

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

14. Chocolate and Almond Protein Bars by Popsugar

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

15. Lentil Spinach Soup by The Garden Grazer

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

16. Chickpea Shawarma Stuffed Pita with Hummus by Naturally Emma

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

17. Vegan Curried Tofu Scramble by The Spruce

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

18. Vegan Lentil Wraps by Beauty Bites

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

19. Jumbo Chickpea Pancake by Oh She Glows

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

20. Chickpea, Mango, and Curried Cauliflower Salad by Cooking and Beer

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

21. Quinoa-Stuffed Poblano Peppers by The Live-In Kitchen

50 High Protein Vegan Recipes for Athletes

Meat-eaters are being put off going veggie because of certain aggressive vegans, says survey

dating whilst vegan
Credit:
Getty

Let’s just get this out of the way from the get-go. The stereotype of the shouty vegan isn’t true to all vegans. There are loads of vegans and vegetarians who aren’t at all preachy or judgmental, and will happily be buddies with meat-eaters and cheese-addicts alike. But there are some vegans and vegetarians who give vegans a bad name… just as there are some meat-eaters who give omnivores a bad name.  They do this by making the world of veganism feel exclusionary and harsh, scolding people for dipping their toe in through flexitarianism, or lecturing meat-eaters when they’re quite clearly not in the mood to be swayed.

VEGETARIAN DIETS CAN REDUCE HEART DISEASE RISK BY ALMOST 50 PERCENT COMPARED TO EATING MEAT

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Here’s some news that will bring a sigh of relief to farm animals: Research from the American Heart Association indicates that plant-based diets might be the best choice to reduce heart failure, even for people that haven’t previously had cardiac conditions. Heart failure occurs gradually and doesn’t necessarily mean your heartstops working. Instead, the organ isn’t strong enough to pump blood throughout your body or is unable to draw in enough blood to supply your body with nutrients. Fairly common, the organization estimates that 6.5 million Americans, over the age of 20, have heart failure.

The preliminary findings were presented at the organization’s Scientific Sessions 2017, which brings researchers and clinicians together to discuss the latest heart health science, according to a release.

Scientists looked at five different dietary plans to determine which cut heart failure risk the most: convenience (including fast food and pasta), plant-based, sweets, Southern (which included sweet beverages and fried foods) and alcohol/salads. People who consumed mostly produce decreased their risk of heart failure by 42 percent, according to a release, compared to those who ate less fruits and vegetables. The other plans weren’t associated with better health. While some studies have shown that a good diet can help decrease plaque buildup in your arteries, this study shows that diet is important in preventing heart failure even for people who don’t already have cardiac concerns.

“Eating a diet mostly of dark green leafy plants, fruits, beans, whole grains and fish, while limiting processed meats, saturated fats, trans fats, refined carbohydrates and foods high in added sugars is a heart-healthy lifestyle and may specifically help prevent heart failure if you don’t already have it,” study co-author Dr. Kyla Lara, an internal medicine specialist, said in a statement.

Using data from a study by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the team looked at data for 15,569 people who did not have coronary artery disease or heart failure. Then, researchers analyzed health records from 2007 to 2013, looked at diets as reported through questionnaires, assigned participants to one of the dietary plans and identified records of 300 hospital visits for heart failure.

While you don’t have to give up all animal products, cardiologist Dr. Gary Fraser believes that those who are the most strict, receive the most benefit. In a story on the NIH site, he explained, “The trend is almost like a stepladder, with the lowest risks for the strict vegetarians, then moving up for the lacto vegetarians and then the pescatarians and then the non-vegetarians.”

For those who really just don’t want to be vegetarian, Gianos said even incorporate more meatless meals into your diet a few times a week can help. Your heart, and cows, will thank you.

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